Showing all posts with: rails
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Pure Rails = BibRave.com

By Andy Wang on January 23, 2014

There’s a rumor going around that Rails isn’t as sexy as it once was; that Javascript is the next world power and Single Page Applications (SPA) have better UX than traditional multi-page sites. Well, to this I say, nay!

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Rails Assets Prefix May Disable your Session

By Ian Yang on March 20, 2013

I recently worked in a Rails project with Peter (@sporkd). The project is intended to be used as a sub-site, and should be served under sub-URI. After google, we ended up by setting config.assets.prefix and wrapped all routes in scope. The solution is simple and worked well. But soon, some weird bugs were found, and Peter was successfully...

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Rails + Girls = A Better Rails Community

By Renae Bair on August 24, 2012

The Rails community has had its share of misogynistic controversy over the last several years. Dominated by male programmers (recent statistics suggest 94% of employed Rails programmers are male), the inroads to professional Rails development for females are not exactly accessible or welcoming. Of course, it's not just the Rails community...

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GreenOnion, The New UI Testing Tool

By Ted O'Meara on August 13, 2012

Don't cry. We've all been there too. Regression issues in the presentation layer make the entire team go crazy. Why can't we have a methodical way of testing the UI to ensure once designs are styled as views, they stay the way that they were created?

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And You Thought Render Farms Were Just For Pixar!

By Jerry Cheung on June 14, 2012

Rails views are typically rendered after some controller action is executed. But the code that powers Rails controllers is flexible and extensible enough to create custom rendering objects that can reuse views and helpers, but live outside of web request processing. In this post, I'll cover what a Rails controller is and what it's...

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Building Streaming REST APIs with Ruby

By Jerry Cheung on May 24, 2012

Twitter popularized the term "firehose API", to mean a realtime stream of data sent through a persistent connection. But even if you're not a realtime service, streaming APIs are great for pushing data from the backend to clients. They reduce resource usage because the server can decide when it's a good time to send a...

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Writing a Custom Rails Cache Store

By Jerry Cheung on March 6, 2012

When you use Rails built-in helpers for page, action, and fragment caching, the cached data is stored into an instance of ActiveSupport::Cache::Store. But while the interface for using the cache stores are the same, each cache store implementation has different performance characteristics and are suited for different jobs. In this post, I'll...

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301 Redirect in a Rails Route

By Intridea on March 2, 2012

What do you get when you discover you setup a route incorrectly ages ago? Why, a redirect of course! And a blog post with some handy redirect code that you might find useful one day!

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Prototyping with Compass and Serve

By Jerry Cheung on January 24, 2012

For prototyping a new webapp, I like to get an HTML prototype on screen as fast as possible. There are a number of ways to achieve this, ranging from the heavyweight Rails, to the lightweight Sinatra. But even a barebones Sinatra app requires you to specify routes and layouts. When I'm focused on sketching out the markup structure and...

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Hunting Down Execution Order Test Failures

By Jerry Cheung on January 11, 2012

Unit tests should pass when run in random order. But for an existing legacy project, certain tests might depend on the execution order. One test might run perfectly fine by itself, but fail miserably when run after another test. Rather than running different combinations manually, RSpec 2.8 has the option to run specs in random order with the...

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What's the Real Future of Web and Mobile Design?

By Ted O'Meara on November 17, 2011

Rails. No, really. The future of web and mobile design is in Rails, Sinatra, Django, and other RESTful web frameworks that can be used to leverage design power across multiple platforms, making it easier and faster (translate: more economical) to design for web, mobile and desktop. Our UI/UX team was stationed up in NYC for the Future of Web...

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Michael Bleigh on Rails 3 at Ruby Midwest

By Intridea on November 2, 2011

Intridea Partner and open source crusader, Michael Bleigh, will be back in his hometown of Kansas City this week, presenting "Rails is the new Rails" at Ruby Midwest. The sweeping changes brought on by Rails 3 and 3.1 haven’t just made our existing development patterns easier, they have opened up the ability for us to build new patterns that...

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Black Magic Rails: default_scope

By Intridea on September 26, 2011

In a community where best practices are always being redefined, black magic practices aren't hard to come by. For our first discussion on controversial Rails practices we're focusing on default_scope. Default Scopes, (Briefly) Explained A default scope is a Rails method provided by ActiveRecord which allows you to specify conditions for...

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One Time, At RailsCamp

By Renae Bair on September 7, 2011

Last month Intridea sponsored RailsCamp New England - a Rails retreat in the western mountains of Maine. Adam and I attended the event for the second time (this was the fourth U.S. Rails Camp, and the second one in Maine) along with 38 other Ruby and Rails developers. On a rainy Friday evening we all settled in the cozy Maine house for a long...

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Startups: Winning With Rails Shops

By Yoshi Maisami on August 12, 2011

In previous posts in this series we talked about how outsourcing your development needs to a Rails shop can make more sense than hiring an internal development team. In this post, we are focusing on startups specifically, and how they are in a unique position to benefit from relying on a Rails shop to build their web applications. Startups...

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Why Your Company Needs A Rails Development Shop

By Dave Naffis on July 19, 2011

In this new blog series, Why Your Company Needs a Rails Development Shop, we’ll discuss why it makes sense to turn to a reputable Rails development company for web application development. In a new market saturated with Ruby and Ruby on Rails buzz, it can be hard to determine who the experts are and where to find them. We hope this series...

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.NET Meets Geospatial Rails at MADExpo

By Pete Jackson on July 11, 2011

Last week, I packed my bags and headed for Norfolk, VA to speak at the Mid-Atlantic Developers Expo. I've spent the better part of the past year traveling the country, speaking about Geospatial Programming using Ruby and Rails. As a long-time lover of maps, the topic has been a joy to introduce to the community of Ruby developers, at both small...

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GemNotifier Goes Open Source

By Roc Yu on July 8, 2011

In April, I announced GemNotifier, a new Intridea SparkTime project. GemNotifier is a web app I created to send notifications to users when the gems they subscribe to are updated. Today, I'm excited to announce that we are open sourcing GemNotifier. At Intridea, we have a long history of support for open source development, and we make every...

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What if Rails Isn't For Beginners Anymore?

By Michael Bleigh on June 16, 2011

There's been a lot of controversy surrounding the changes to Rails 3.1. It started with an epic GitHub commit thread and the discussion exploded again in the past few days after What the Hell is Hapenning to Rails and Yehuda's response thereto. I'm going to address the issue from a perspective that honestly hadn't even occurred...

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Conversations: The Controller Setter Pattern

By Michael Bleigh on June 7, 2011

One of the first things that anyone has to do in an application is assign instance variables in controllers for use in views, etc. This pattern, while dead simple, has a number of possible implementations that each have their aesthetic benefits and drawbacks. At RailsConf I had the opportunity to hash this out with none other than DHH and...

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Rails 3: Fully Loaded

By Andy Wang on May 13, 2011

It's been close to a year since Rails 3 came out and I've had the pleasure of working on several Rails 3 projects since its release. Some existing gems became irrelevant with the release of Rails 3, while others lived. Additionally, we've seen many new gems come to life. I'd like to share a stack of gems that I've been using this year. Hopefully...

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Announcing Profanity Filter for Rails

By Adam Bair on March 17, 2011

I'm pleased to announce Profanity Filter for Rails. This gem filters undesirable words from text and displays a friendly version. Filtering is non-destructive by default but has the option of replacing the original text. It's based on a dictionary that is customizable so you can add additional words as needed.

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Easy Rails Admin Login with Google Apps and OmniAuth

By Michael Bleigh on January 31, 2011

When you're building a web application, there's always the question of how to handle the site-wide administration. You probably have a small list of people at your company that should be able to access it. If you're like Intridea, you also use Google Apps to handle e-mail etc. Using OmniAuth it is trivially simple to set up a simple...

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Calling Methods on Potential Nil Objects in Rails

By Raymond Law on November 2, 2010

Rails adds a pretty cool Object#try method. From Rails doc: try(method, *args, &block) This Invokes the method identified by the symbol method, passing it any arguments and/or the block specified, just like the regular Ruby Object#send does. Unlike that method however, a NoMethodError exception will not be raised and nil will be returned...

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Using Present.ly for Rails Rumble Collaboration

By Terry Tai on October 29, 2010

We chose to use Present.ly as our communication tool during the Rumble. Present.ly is a private micro blogging system. It uses XMPP like most IM services use, so it's instant. But unlike IM, the messages are well organized thanks to the way it uses threading to display message replies. Plus, there are no messy chat logs to sift through! We...

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The Rails Rumble: An Intridean Tradition

By Intridea on October 18, 2010

This weekend was the fourth annual Rails Rumble event; a software contest among Rails developers, in which smalls teams of coders bring an app to life in just 48 hours. In the week following the Rumble, the apps are judged by an expert panel of judges, winners are selected, and honor is won. Intridea is no stranger to the Rumble. We've...

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Using BIND locally on OS X for easy access to subdomains

By Jon Kinney on June 2, 2010

In a staging or production environment this involves modifying the DNS and adding a wildcard entry that points all hosts to the primary domain specified. To develop and test the subdomain aspect of a web application like this, most of the time developers just edit their hosts file locally and add an entry that piggybacks on the localhost entry....

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OpenSocial, Buzz and the Tao of Releasing an API

By Pradeep Elankumaran on November 3, 2007

Michael Arrington announced OpenSocial on TechCrunch two days before its official release. Prior to that, there were whispers everywhere about Google’s new social platform, but not many seemed to know what exactly was about to go down. Needless to say, this is good buzz. Two days before ‘launch’ the overwhelming mood among web...

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Improved BetterNestedSet Plugin

By Adam Bair on October 27, 2007

On a recent project when I was using the BetterNestedSet plugin to manage a large hierarchal set of data, I encountered a problem that required me to find all of the items in a nested set that had children and those that didn't. In nested set terms I wanted: all 'parent' nodes and all 'leaf' nodes that exist within the 'tree'. If you want to...

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